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Perception vs actual intakes of junk food and sugar-sweetened beverages

14 / 11 / 17

A group of 246 young adults from Perth, Western Australia were asked about their diet concerns, perceptions and intentions about energy-dense, nutrient-poor junk food (JF) and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Their intake was then recorded with photographs using a mobile food record (mFR) over 4 days.

Mean intake was 3.7 servings/day (1 serving = 600kJ). Those who were most health-conscious of their diet consumed less than those who only took a bit of notice, didn’t think much about it, or didn’t think at all about health aspects of food. Differences between the sexes were found: women thinking about cutting down on SSBs actually consumed more than men thinking about cutting down (1.5 vs 0.7). Men not thinking of cutting down on JF consumed more than women not thinking of cutting down (4.6 vs 2.5).

Results showed perception and attitudes about JF and SSB were associated with level of consumption. Those not thinking about reducing their intake consumed more.

Harry AJ, Boushey CJ, Pollard CM, Panizza CE et al. Perception vs actual intakes of junk food and sugar-sweetened beverages in Australian adults: assessed using the mobile health record. Public Health Nutr 2017;20(13):2300-2307