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Research Updates | Cardiovascular disease

Ecological relationships between saturated fat, sucrose, food groups and Mediterranean food pattern score to 50-year coronary heart disease mortality rates among 16 cohorts of the Seven Countries Study.

21 / 08 / 18

Finding: Lower long-term CHD rates are correlated with traditional Mediterranean and Japanese dietary patterns rich in vegetables and low in sweet foods and animal foods.

Summary: This study examined ecological relationships of foods, nutrients, eating patterns and the Mediterranean Adequacy Index (MAI) score with long term CHD mortality rates in 16 cohorts of 12,763 men the Seven Countries Study* over 50 years. Dietary surveys were done at baseline, and average food consumption was chemically analysed for fatty acids and carbohydrates. CHD death rates varied 6.7-fold among the cohorts. Results showed mortality rates for CHD were positively correlated with average intake of hard fat, sweet products, animal foods, saturated fat and sucrose, but not with naturally occurring sugars. Intake of vegetable foods, starch and the MAI were inversely correlated with CHD mortality.

Citation: Kromhout, D, Menotti, A, Alberti-Fidanza, A, Puddu, P E, and Hollman, P, Kafatos, A, et al.  Comparative ecologic relationships of saturated fat, sucrose, food groups, and a Mediterranean food pattern score to 50-year coronary heart disease mortality rates among 16 cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 May 17

 

*NOTE: The Seven Countries Study is a large longitudinal study of the USA, Finland, The Netherlands, Italy, Greece, former Yugoslavia (Croatia, Serbia), and Japan that began in the 1960s. It is the first major study to investigate diet and lifestyle and risk factors for CVD across contrasting countries over an extended period.