News Banner

News, Media & FAQs

News, Media & FAQs | Current news

Ipsos Food CHATs (Consumption, Habits, Attitudes, Trends) Annual Report 2015-16

23 / 05 / 16

The data in this report was obtained from an online survey of a nationally representative sample of 3000 consumers and food decision-makers aged over 18 years conducted in December 2015.

The key findings are as follows:

Sugar remains the no. 1 ‘enemy’, and more so than salt and fat. The belief there is too much sugar in packaged foods ranks as number 1 in the top 10 attitudes towards food and health. Cutting back sugar is definitely a priority for Australians. They want to do it, they think about it doing it, and they think they should be doing it. One in four people has tried to reduce sugar generally, but actually changing consumption is more difficult. Very few Australians will actually prioritise reducing sugar in the next 12 months, and they   don’t want to replace sugar with ‘natural’ or artificial alternatives.

Australians have a simple approach to health with most aiming to eat more natural, fresh and unprocessed foods. Smaller portion sizes and healthy snacks are also a priority. Extreme diet fads are achieving exposure - the Paleo diet has achieved the most awareness overall -but trial of these diets remains low amongst typical Australians. The highest proportion (40%) of people intended to prioritise eating more fresh fruits and vegetables in the next 12 months. Taste and price continue to be the leading considerations when purchasing groceries. Two out of three people cooked dinner from scratch the day before the survey, primarily because it was healthier and cheaper.

Food CHATs Annual Report 2015-16. Australia’s most comprehensive study integrating consumer attitudinal trends with consumption behaviour change

Access the report at http://ipsos.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Food-CHATs-report-abridged.2016.pdf

NEXT: (ABS) added sugars data released 

Sign up to our newsletter

Receive the latest newsletter with research on sugar. Plus insights from scientific experts.


View previous issues